Thursday, March 28, 2013

Crows At The Compost Pile

Thursday, March 29, 2013


34.5° now, windless, as the sun struggles to get through the clouds. Sugar snow fell briefly last night and the close-to-freezing temperatures after midnight allowed the snow to cling to everything above ground like a kid's hair to a party balloon. 

A sat here a while ago cruising along through email and thinking about how much easier it has been to write on Facebook and Twitter than on this blog. I have neglected the faithful and seem to return with an excuse like a person of religion returns to church on Easter but not again until the following year. I have been disappointed with blog readership and have yet to figure out why when I link blog posts to Facebook, many fewer people read the posts than read regular posts. Perhaps notice of a blog posting suggests something too long to read and folks allow their brains to redirect themselves to reading that which requires less concentration. I don't know but maybe one of you who understands social media metrics better than me can share some thoughts.

I went outside earlier to dust off the bird feeders and replenish the breakfast buffets. The red polls are in their glory and their numbers are the largest I have ever seen. Over two hundred were here earlier this morning and I just did a quick count out the kitchen window and stopped at 239 on the feeders on that side of the house. While outside I heard the conversations three crows were having from the maple that hangs over the compost pile. I don't speak crow very well but I do know that these were conversations of spring and the happiness that it brings to all critters, humans included. The crows talked for quite some time excepting the two pictured above who have been in that maple, quiet and motionless since I screwed their plastic bodies to a limb years and years ago. They are crow decoys that some people actually use for hunting. But to me crows are the scavengers of the world, the clean up batters who clear bases and win games. The decoys are well known to the real birds but over the years the phonies have conjured up a lot of  "Heh, look at those birds!" as visitors have toured the gardens.

I'm still thinking about blogging and social media. I like it all. I started yesterday morning with a phone call from a FB friend in Erie, Pennsylvania who reported it was snowing there and spring was not quick to arrive. An hour later I received a call from an incredible cypripedium grower in Germany and we started by comparing weather issues across a very similar latitude. That grower is Michael Weinert, owner of Frosch Exclusive Perennials  http://www.cypripedium.de/English/english.html  Michael grows lady slippers like you have probably never seen before. I fully intend to begin to grow these at Vermont Flower Farm in another year after I raise up a guard dog to stand post because Michael's hybrids are beauties!! Check out his site if you get a minute.

The clock is moving faster than I am this morning and I have promised Alex we will leave for Hanover and West Lebanon by 10:30. I better get going! Be well and enjoy today. If all else fails today, find a maple sugar house that is boiling and go taste a fresh crop of the best syrup the world has to offer. Vermont is the best!

George Africa
The Vermont Gardener
On Facebook as Vermont Flower Farm and Gardens and also as George Africa
On Twitter as vtflowerfarm
Always here to help you grow your grow thumb.... and remind you "Social Networking Works"!

3 comments:

James Trundy Verrill said...

I hear you George and have noticed the very same thing!

http://fayrehalefarm.com/

Lewis Ward said...

George,
I don't always read peoples blogs. I do like the more contemplative style of blogs rather than the more thoughtless writing on FB and political news-fracking etc. I think many succumb to laziness or are just busy. I try to make it a point to go check up on blogs.
Don't take it personally, because your blogs are a joy to read.

Donalyn Ketchum said...

I like crows. My husband who grew up on a farm doesn't - they eat the corn after it's planted and get in all sorts of places that farmers don't want them. They are really very smart though and do provide a valuable service. I have been glad to be hearing them so much again lately!
have a great day -
Donalyn @ http://thecreeksidecook.com